sinthematica

heavily Lacanian...

concerning philosophy, psychology, psychoanalysis, anthropology, linguistics, history, and antiquity. subtopics: jouissance, sexuality, gender, sexuation, creativity, lack, divided subjectivity, identification, ideology, being, death and becoming.

sometimes original poetry (but shhh)

if it's not quoted, it's [being] written by me.

sinthematica

What does Lacan say about everything?
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(Source: disneydeviants)

"The danger of computers becoming like humans is not nearly as great as that of humans becoming like computers."



- Konrad Zuse (1910-1995),
inventor of the Z3, the first fully-programmable computer (via leadingtone)



spiritdick:

I want to know why

spiritdick:

I want to know why

(Source: ahlistoquevillero)

"The more I read the pessimists, the more I love life. After reading Schopenhauer, I always feel like a bridegroom on his wedding night."



- Emile Cioran (via stickyembraces)



A con man stored in attaché case, trench coat and pipe dream. 

"First off, let’s get rid of this average Joe, who does not exist. He is a statistical fiction. There are individuals, and that is all. When I hear people talking about the guy in the street, studies of public opinion, mass phenomena, and so on, I think of all the patients that I’ve seen on the couch in forty years of listening. None of them in any measure resembled the others, none of them had the same phobias and anxieties, the same way of talking, the same fear of not understanding."



- Jacques Lacan, http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/1668-there-can-be-no-crisis-of-psychoanalysis-jacques-lacan-interviewed-in-1974 (via chipclayton)



"

I define it as a symptom – something that reveals the malaise of the society in which we live…the symptom – or let’s call it the illness – has no relationship to anything, and lacks any kind of meaning. Even if it is apparently real, it does not exist…going beyond the apparent symptom [one can] locate the tangled knot of truth at the heart of the matter. […] Psychoanalysis is successful when it clears the ground, goes beyond symptoms, goes beyond the real. That is to say, when it touches the truth.

[…] I call a ‘symptom’ everything that comes from the real. And the real is everything that isn’t right, does not work, and is opposed to man’s life and his engagement with his personality. The real always returns to the same place. And it is there that you will always find it, in the same trappings…

The real and the impossible are antithetical and cannot go together. Analysis pushes the subject toward the impossible, suggesting to him that he ought to consider the world as it truly is – that is, an imaginary world without meaning. Whereas the real is like a gluttonous seagull, and only feeds on meaningful things, actions that have some meaning.

"



-  Jacques Lacan, ‘There can be no crisis of psychoanalysis’, reprinted interview with Emilio Granzotto of Italian Panorama magazine, 1974



just had a patient leave my office (affectionately) saying something like, “You know, when I come up here to see you, I mean to leave after no more than 30 minutes…and then I end up talking for a whole hour! I hate you for that!”

'There can be no crisis of psychoanalysis’, reprinted interview with Lacan (1974)

Emilio Granzotto: What is it that drives people to have themselves analysed?

Jacques Lacan: Fear. When something happens to someone and they do not understand it, even if they wanted it to happen, they are afraid. They suffer from not understanding, and little by little they fall into a panic. This is neurosis. With hysterical neurosis, the body becomes ill from the fear of being ill, and without really being so. With obsessive neurosis, the fear brings bizarre things to mind, thoughts that cannot be controlled, phobias in which forms and objects acquire different meanings that make people afraid.

[...]

Granzotto: But what is anxiety, in psychoanalysis?

Lacan: Something that is situated outside our body, a fear, but a fear of nothing, that can be driven by the body, including the mind. The fear of fear, in sum.

"[Freud’s] doctrine put truth itself in question, and this concerns everyone, each individual personally… Let’s say that [psychoanalysis is] a practice, and it is concerned with whatever is not going right."



- Jacques Lacan, ‘There can be no crisis of psychoanalysis’, reprinted interview with Emilio Granzotto of Italian Panorama magazine, 1974



"…Freud. How can it be said that he has been left behind, when we have still not yet entirely understood him? …We must not forget that [psychoanalysis] is something entirely new, with regard to both medicine and psychology and its outliers."



-  Jacques Lacan, ‘There can be no crisis of psychoanalysis’, reprinted interview with Emilio Granzotto of Italian Panorama magazine, 1974



tyleroakley:

when I add my own caption to a post

image

(Source: tyleroakley)

heteroglossia:

Though I bury all I own or hold close though my skin outlives the trees though the lines fall shattering the stone I cannot catch them. They have the lilting accent of a house I saw but never entered. They are the sounds a child hears – the water, the afternoon, the sky. I watch them now trickling through the open mirror. Sometimes, but almost never we touch what we desire.
— Peter Boyle, “Robert Frost at Eighty”

heteroglossia:

Though I bury all I own or hold close
though my skin outlives the trees
though the lines fall shattering the stone
I cannot catch them.
They have the lilting accent
of a house I saw but never entered.
They are the sounds a child hears –
the water, the afternoon, the sky.
I watch them now
trickling through the open mirror.
Sometimes, but almost never
we touch what we desire.

— Peter Boyle, “Robert Frost at Eighty”

"Intimacy cannot be expressed discursively. The swelling to the bursting point, the malice that breaks out with clenching teeth and weeps; the sinking feeling that doesn’t know where it comes from or what it’s about; the fear that sings its head off in the dark; the white-eyed pallor, the sweet sadness, the rage and the vomiting… are so many evasions."



- Georges Bataille, Theory of Religion (via ljosio)